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Comprehending Comp Time

Weekly HR News –Leaves of Absence

Comprehending Comp Time

With winter weather looming, along with the extra work it brings, many city employees will be working longer than normal schedules.  The question then becomes whether or not a city can allow its employees to earn compensatory time, also known as comp time.

In years past, compensatory time was only an option for counties.  Then in 2009, KRS 337.285 was amended to permit cities and their nonexempt city employees to agree on the earning of compensatory time in lieu of overtime pay.  

The statute does set some guidelines for the allowance of comp time:  

- It only applies to non-exempt (hourly) employees; however, employers can provide comp time as a fringe benefit to exempt employees through policy and it would not have to follow this statute.  

- The request to accrue compensatory time must be made in writing, freely and without pressure or suggestion by the employer, before performance of the work.  

- If authorized in writing by the employer, an employee may accrue compensatory time in lieu of overtime pay at the rate of not less than one and one half hours for each hour the employee is authorized to work in excess of 40 hours in a work week. 

- The maximum number of compensatory hours that may be accrued is 480 for city employees engaged in a public safety, emergency response or seasonal activity.  For employees engaged in all other work, 240 hours are allowed.  Any hours over these maximums must be paid to the employee in overtime compensation at the regular rate earned by the employee at the time the employee receives the payment.  In addition, a city can set the maximum accrual hours at less than the statutory maximums.

- A city employee who requests the use of compensatory time must be allowed to use the compensatory time within a reasonable period after making the request, if use of the compensatory time does not unduly disrupt operations of the employer. Mere inconvenience to the employer is not a sufficient basis for denial.  

- An employer cannot use compensatory time as a means to avoid statutory overtime compensation. Therefore, an employer cannot pressure an employee to accept more compensatory time than the employer can realistically expect to be able to grant within a reasonable period. 

- Upon termination of employment, all unused accrued compensatory time earned by nonexempt employees must be paid at a rate of compensation not less than the average rate received by the employee during the last three years or the final regular rate received by the employee, whichever is higher. 

For additional questions regarding comp time for exempt and nonexempt employees or for sample policies or the required agreement, contact personnel services specialist, Andrea Shindlebower Main, at ashindlebower@klc.org

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Employment Law Posters

Weekly HR News - Hiring Practices

Employment Law Posters

All required federal and state employment law posters can be downloaded and printed at no cost to employers.  For federal posters, the DOL website provides assistance for employers in deciding which federal posters are required, and provides those posters for free.  State-required posters and notices can also be printed for free on the Kentucky Labor Cabinet webpage

Kentucky League of Cities (KLC) strives to notify cities of new poster requirements and changes as they occur; however, all cities should check the above links and the federal and state Department of Labor websites frequently as the statutory laws and federal regulations can change.  Employers are also required to hang posters in readily viewable "conspicuous places" and "in every establishment" in which employees are employed. 

For questions employment law posters or other personnel matters, contact KLC personnel services specialist, Andrea Shindlebower Main.    

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Domestic Violence and the Workplace
Posted on October 17, 2017 by Andrea Shindlebower in Employee Safety

Weekly HR – Workplace Violence

Domestic Violence and the Workplace

October is Domestic Violence Awareness month and if you are wondering why this should be a human resource topic, here are some statistics:

  • Domestic violence is one of the leading cause of violence in the workplace with at least one in five employees having been the victim of domestic violence (U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)).
  • Homicide is currently the fourth leading cause of fatal occupational injuries and it is the second leading cause of death for women in the workplace (Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)).
  • 75% of domestic violence victims face harassment from intimate partners while they are at work (Family Violence Prevention Fund).
  • 27% of all violent events in the workplace, including workplace shootings, are tied to some form of domestic violence (U.S. Department of Labor).
  • 96% of domestic violence victims experience problems at work due to abuse (American Institute on Domestic Violence).  This can include situations where the victim is either prevented from going to work by the abuser or they are absent due to injuries or mental issues caused by the abuse.  The time away from work can be broken down as follows:
    • 56% of victims are late
    • 28% of victims leave early
    • 54% of victims miss entire days
  • The CDC states that these particular absences cost employers at least $2 billion in lost productivity annually and employer health care costs related to domestic violence are more than $4 billion a year.
  • Employers may also face liability based on how they react to domestic violence in the workplace:
    • Employers may violate discrimination laws if they take adverse actions against victims. For example, an employer may face liability if a female victim of domestic violence is disciplined for being absent while another employee is not.  Or the employer takes adverse action against a female victim that uses FMLA or leave as an accommodation under the ADA for medical reasons related to domestic violence. 
    • Although OSHA does not have specific standards for domestic violence, they can cite employers under its “general duty clause,” requiring employers to provide a safe workplace, including any dangers related to domestic violence.

For these reasons and more, employers should have workplace violence prevention policies and a plan that specifically addresses domestic violence in the workplace. Your workplace violence policy should define domestic violence and provide information for recognizing signs of victimization.  Signs of domestic violence can include:

 

  • Frequent or unplanned leave
  • Change in job performance
  • Unexplained bruises or injuries, often attributed to “falls,” “being clumsy,” or “accidents”
  • Dress that is inappropriate (i.e. long sleeves in the summer)
  • Sudden change of address
  • Isolation, unusual quietness, or avoiding others
  • An unusual number of phone calls or emails from a current or former partner, strong reactions to those calls, and reluctance to respond to phone messages
  • Disruptive personal visits to the workplace by present or former partner
  • Self-neglect
  • Anxiety and depression
  • Drug and alcohol dependence

In addition, the policy should provide response requirements and available information regarding assistance for an employee experiencing domestic violence.  Employers should also be certain that all supervisors are trained in how to handle these situations, which may include:

 

  • Providing a picture of the perpetrator to human resources
  • Identifying an emergency contact person
  • If absence is necessary, the employee should be clear about their return to work plan
  • Save threatening e-mail or voice-mail messages for future use in possible legal situations
  • Arrange for priority parking
  • Screen calls and have employee’s name removed from automated phone directories
  • Limit information disclosed by phone about employee
  • Relocate workspace to a more secure area or another site
  • Put the employee in contact with your city employee assistance plan and/or the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233)
  • Work with local law enforcement as needed and encourage employee to do the same
  • Arrange flexible work hours so employee can seek protection, go to court, look for new housing, arrange child care, etc.

Don’t let your workplace become another staggering statistic.  Be proactive in implementing the necessary measures to keep all your employees safe.  If your city needs sample policies or training on workplace violence or any other personnel matters, contact Andrea Shindlebower Main, personnel services specialist. 

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Human Resources Audit - Five Ws to Keep Your City in Compliance
Posted on September 28, 2017 by Andrea Shindlebower in Human Resources Audits

Weekly HR News - Human Resources Audit

Five Ws to Keep Your City in Compliance

Who needs to do an HR Audit?

HR personnel as well as the executive authority for the city must be certain that HR audits are being done.  Persons within these positions are on the frontlines of all the personnel action and must be a knowledgeable resource for the employees and management.

Why do you need an HR audit?

Federal, state and local employment laws can be very complex. Violations of these laws, even when unintentional, can lead to lawsuits, fines, bad publicity and even employee frustration.  Issues also present themselves when you have in place rogue management, or those who do not have sufficient training to handle employment issues as they arise. Eliminating those risks is a significant responsibility of HR.

When should the HR audit occur?

Typically an HR audit should be done on a yearly basis; however, some cities find that several mini-audits throughout the year make this task less cumbersome.  Changes in the law occur annually, so in order to maintain legal compliance the city’s policies and procedures need to be updated at least that frequently.  Making the time to do a complete HR audit not only ensures compliance with the laws, but it also provides opportunities to improve the effectiveness of the city’s HR practices such as employee performance and engagement. In addition, if there is an issue with employees or management, discovering these problems in a timely manner can keep them from spiraling out of control. 

What should be audited?

The first thing any city should do when completing an HR audit is to create and review a comprehensive checklist.  At the very least, the city should review the following areas:

  • Employment Law Updates (federal, state and local)
  • Do you have I-9 Forms on all employees? Are you using the most current form dated 7/17/17?
  • Discipline Procedures and Documentation
  • Equal Opportunity
  • Wage and Hour Administration
  • Job Elimination/Separation Documentation
  • Hiring Process
  • Benefits Administration, ERISA and COBRA (or State Continuation Coverage if less than 20 employees)
  • Personnel Files and Records
  • Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
  • Policies and Procedures
  • Workplace Harassment  and Sexual Harassment
  • Discrimination
  • Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA)
  • Uniformed Services Act (USERRA) and Kentucky Military Law
  • Background Investigations
  • Drug and Alcohol Testing

However, it isn’t enough to check these items off your list. Even if all of your policies are completely up-to-date and legally compliant, if city officials and supervisors do not practice what they preach, the liability risks increase significantly. For example, even if you have a legally compliant workplace harassment policy, it will not create a respectful workplace. If the executive authority or supervisors ignore or allow disrespectful behavior, the policy is not worth the paper on which it is written and can lead to costly litigation.  As part of this process, you have to be certain that the policies are being followed as they are written.  Do this by auditing employees for their feedback and reviewing any employee complaints that may have been filed to look for holes in the process.

Where do you take the results?

The results should not sit on the shelf.  Once any potential issues have been identified, be certain that the executive authority in your city is aware of the issues.  The executive authority must then make changes to city policies or HR processes to get your city into compliance.  Do this by updating personnel policies and by providing training to employees, supervisors and management personnel.  Especially target those in management who are not following procedures. Emphasize the fact that any employee or supervisor not following the policies and procedures will be subject to discipline, including termination from employment. 

No matter what your HR audit looks like, it is important to engage in continual observation and improvement of the city's policies, procedures and practices.  By doing this, you will ensure that your city never ceases to improve. 

For a sample HR Audit Checklist or questions on this or other personnel matters, contact personnel services specialist, Andrea Shindlebower Main.

 

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Municipal Employee Handbooks

Weekly HR News –

Municipal Employee Handbooks

An employee handbook is a valuable communication tool to allow employees to understand what is expected of them and what they can expect from the city as the employer.  In addition, an employee handbook will be of vital importance in defending an employment-related claim. It shows that your city had in place personnel and employee policies relating to the employment relationship, that the employee was aware of those policies and that those policies were followed by the city.   

Employee handbooks should be drafted in clear, concise and easy-to-understand language.  At a minimum, employee handbooks should include the following:

  1. A conspicuous disclaimer in the front of the handbook that the handbook does not create contractual rights and that employees continue to be terminable at will. 
  2. A clear, comprehensive equal employment opportunity statement that includes state and federal law requirements.
  3. A policy regarding how an employee that may need an ADA accommodation would make that request, and that the employee must initiate the request for a possible accommodation.
  4. A harassment/discrimination policy condemning all forms of unlawful harassment, not just sexual harassment.  The policy should also clearly set out an easy-to-follow process for filing a complaint and stating what action will be taken, including termination, if it is determined that harassment or discrimination has occurred.  In addition, there should be provisions that provide protection for an employee that is retaliated against based upon the filing of a complaint.
  5. An explanation of the employee disciplinary procedures and examples of the types of behavior that will subject an employee to discipline or immediate termination and the process that will be followed in addressing disciplinary problems.  In addition, make sure that the examples of behavior include a disclaimer that they are not an all-inclusive list of the items that can result in disciplinary action.
  6. Information on the applicable forms of leave that the city provides, or is required to provide by law.  The policy should include information on the process for requesting leaves and any requirements such as forms that must be filled out and any applicable timeframes. 
  7. A policy as to what employees are entitled to overtime and when overtime is paid.  This policy should also include a requirement that employees must request permission from the supervisor before the time is worked.  In addition, include information on work that is done “off the clock” and how and when this time is compensable for nonexempt employees.
  8. Information on the privacy protection requirements that are found in 61.931- 61.934.

In addition to the above, an employee handbook may address any and all policies you may have, such as: hiring procedures, time cards, compensatory time, payroll deductions, personnel files, job references, social media and other computer usage issues, benefits, dress codes, alcohol and drug use policies, expense reimbursements, reporting work place accidents, return to work requirements and safety guidelines.

To be effective, cities should be certain that every employee is provided with a personal copy of the employee handbook at the time of hire, as well as the city ethics ordinance, if it is applicable to city employees.  Employees should also be required to sign an acknowledgement stating that they received a copy of the employee handbook and that they are responsible for reading and understanding the information contained in the handbook.   This signed acknowledgement should be placed in the employee's personnel file and maintained pursuant to the Kentucky Department of Libraries and Archives Record Retention Schedule.  In addition, any time that an amendment is made to the handbook, employees should be required to sign an additional acknowledgment regarding the specific change. 

In addition to providing an employee a copy of the handbook, employers should provide training for employees on any changes to the policies and allow time for them to ask any questions that they may have regarding the handbook.  Maintaining proof of that training and who was in attendance, can provide excellent proof in the event that an employee claims that they were not aware of something contained within the handbook.

The executive authority and/or human resources person should continually review city policies to be certain that they are up-to-date with any recent employment law changes.  If it has been more than a few years since they were last updated, they are not current.  Checking on these matters now could prevent costly liability issues from occurring in the future. 

If you need to update your policies, keep in mind that cities are unique. When it comes to creating or updating your personnel policies, you need to work with someone who not only has expertise in personnel law and human resource matters, but someone who knows municipal law as well.  KLC can offer this expertise in a way that is specific to your city’s needs.  Whether it is creating or reviewing city personnel policies or providing training on your city policies or on a variety of specialized HR topics, KLC has you covered. 

For more information on making sure your policies are legally compliant, plan to attend the KLC Conference, Wednesday October 4th at 10:45 for an informative session on this topic.  If you can’t make the conference, or if you would like to discuss a review of your current policies contact personnel service specialist, Andrea Shindlebower Main for details on this service.

 

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New Form I-9 Effective September 2017
Posted on August 28, 2017 by Andrea Shindlebower in Employee Forms

Weekly HR News - Hiring

New Form I-9 Effective September 2017

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has released a new version of the I-9 Employment Eligibility Verification. The new form is dated 07/17/17 in the lower left corner, and it replaces a version dated 11/14/2016. Employers may use either form through September 17, 2017, but beginning on Sept. 18, 2017, the new version of the form must be used for any new hires.

The USCIS states the changes to the form are as follows:

Revisions to the Form I-9 Instructions:

  • The name of the Office of Special Counsel for Immigration-Related Unfair Employment Practices has been changed to its new name, Immigrant and Employee Rights Section.
  • The words “the end of” have been removed from the phrase “the first day of employment.”

Revisions related to the List of Acceptable Documents on Form I-9:

  • The Consular Report of Birth Abroad (Form FS-240) has been added to List C.
  • All the certifications of report of birth issued by the Department of State (Form FS-545, Form DS-1350, and Form FS-240) have been combined into selection C#2 in List C.
  • All List C documents except the Social Security card have been renumbered.

The USCIS has also issued a revised Handbook for Employers (M-274) that contains the most current information on completing the I-9.  Note that ALL employers, including cities, are required to fill out an I-9 form on all new hires. 

This form is used to verify the employee’s identity and their ability to work in the United States and should be filled out on the first day of employment with the city.  Penalties for not filling out this form, or from filling it out improperly can cost the city thousands of dollars. 

Also, keep in mind that if you are going to keep paper copies, it is a good practice to have one file with all employee I-9s within that file in alphabetical order. This is to be sure that you can easily comply with the three-day requirement to turn over these documents if requested by the Department of Labor or Department of Justice.  Another reason for this practice, is that the information on these forms is confidential and would never be subject to an open records request.  Having them outside of the personnel file, and in a locked cabinet, ensures that they will remain confidential. 

Retention of these records will be at least as long as the employee works for the city.  Once the employee has left city employment you are required to keep them three years from the date of hire or one year from the date of termination whichever is longer.  The USCIS website can assist in calculating the required retention of each form. 

For questions about this or any other employment related matters, contact personnel service specialist, Andrea Shindlebower Main.

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